[review] Accel DD-SS Digital Delay (by rlm)

California based company Accel specializes in pedal boards, cables, power supplies and effects. They have recently released three effect pedals in the “select series” range which are built in China. The company offers original equipment manufacturer pedals from selected manufactures that have been well proven out in tone, quality, price and sales. These pedals are actually made by another manufacturer and tweaked to Accel’s specifications. You can read more about the company’s philosophy on their website.

As with the rest of the pedals in their range, the DD-SS Digital Delay looks rather cheap and plain. Covered in a blue metal shell, it is however built to last. The pedal is either powered by a 9v adapter or a 9v battery. The battery cap on the back can be easily opened thanks to a very user friendly locking system similar to the one you’ll find on BOSS pedals. The LED on the pedal will dim when it’s low on battery power so you’ll know when it’s time to change the battery.

[review] T-Rex Vulture - Distortion (by rlm)

The Danish company T-Rex has been around for nearly twenty years, as it was founded in 1996. The company is renowned for their high quality pedals and accessories. Amongst their many users are guitar legends like David Gilmour, Pete Townshend and John Mayer, to name a few.

When buying a T-Rex pedal, you know what to expect. A high quality product with high standards in sound, built quality and reliability. In their line-up we come across some legendary products as the replica, roommate, mudhoney, moller and their fuel tank series.

T-Rex has recently extended their effects line up with a few new pedals. One of them is the Vulture. On their website, the Danes state that the Vulture is actually modified version of one of the first pedals they created back in the 90's which was a bit grungy in the low end. They started from that pedal to create a distortion pedal with a tighter, less fuzzy low end and with more gain. The Vulture has been born...

[review] DOD 440 Envelope Filter (by LievenDV)

The 2014 version of the DOD 440 is the reissue of a classic envelope filter. This time it comes with true bypass (while its ancestor didn't). The control scheme of this pedal is simple: 2 knobs adjust Level and Range, a switch changes the voicing from "Up" to "Down".

[review] Joyo Ironman JF-316 Future Chorus - Chorus (by rlm)

By now, JOYO is a rather well known manufacturer of effect pedals and many accessories for the modern musician. This Chinese company is adored by many due to the quality of the products they offer at reasonable pricing. Not that long ago, JOYO released a range of small effect pedals called the Ironman series. This series of mini pedals covers a whole range of overdrive, distortion, boost and modulation effects. One of their latest additions is the Future chorus.

As is the case with the other pedals in the range, the Future chorus takes little space on your pedal board. Since it's that small, there is no room for a battery and therefore a 9v power supply is required. Inside the box you'll find a patch of velcro and a rubber strip that have been cut out to the size of the pedal. Once attached, the rubber strip will prevent the pedal from sliding all over the place when placed on the floor. The patch of velcro can be used if you want to put the pedal on your pedal board. The pedal itself has a plastic cover to protect your settings while playing. The logo will light up on the cover when the pedal is active. And of course, this pedal is true bypass, just like the other pedals in the Ironman range.

[review] Joyo Ironman JF-309 Boogie Master (by rlm)

JOYO has increased their range of mini pedals with a series of amp simulator pedals which capture the distinctive tones of well-respected amplifier brands like Fender, Orange, Marshall, Vox and Mesa Boogie. These pedals feature a cab simulator which makes it very easy for recording.

The Boogie Master (to no surprise) tries to capture the famous Californian sound. Many adore the low, fat tones Mesa Boogie amplifiers produce. Now Joyo has come up with a neat little pedal of which they claim "brings you modern rock and metal sounds reminiscent of the leading company in the field. The sound is always fat and always huge." 

[review] Accel RV-SS Classic Reverbs (by rlm)

Accel is a California based company that specializes in pedal boards, cables, power supplies and effects. They have recently released three effect pedals in the “select series” range which are built in China. The company offers original equipment manufacturer pedals from selected manufacturers that have been well proven out in tone, quality, price and sales. These pedals are actually made by another manufacturer and tweaked to Accel's specifications. You can read more about the company's philosophy on their website

Accel claims to offer a quality product that won't drain your wallet. Does the rv-ss Classic Reverbs live up to that claim? 

[review] Caline CP-26 Snake Bite - Reverb (by Bieke)

Caline has been around since 2010, and until now, this modest Asian company offers a full line of budget friendly pedals, their latest addition is the CP-30 Red Devil metal distortion. At the Musikmesse I stumbled into the Caline booth to check it out and I noticed the CP-26 Snake Bite reverb. I figured I’d give it a try. Well, first impression was that it sounded surprisingly good. First impressions can be misleading, so I did get another opportunity to give it another try. Here’s my review.

Caline Snake Bite ReverbThe looks

Well, Caline has this no nonsense standardized and uniform approach towards their line of pedals, low profile marketing, plain cardboard box, a uniform pedal housing, plain colors, classic knobs … Spartan looks.

The Snake Bite is a bit different, it still has the standard aluminum cast housing, and it’s a plain black pedal with white lettering, actually a stylish look, 2 rows of 3 controls each, white fluted knobs with black markers.  The pots feel solid, just enough stiffness for finetuning the controls.

9V DC adapter socket on top, in- and output on the sides. Status LED. 

It looks expensive.

Inside, it looks clean, jacks and pots are soldered onto the main PCB, whereas the switch is soldered onto a separate PCB, there is no battery clip.

[review] D*A*M Ezekiel 25:17 - Low Frequency Distortion Generator (by LievenDV)

D*A*M

David A Main and Linzi Haynes make up D*A*M. I'm sure his own initials made up the brand name but they turned it into "Differential Audio Manifestationz".

They bring back the iconic Ezekiel in this new and massive iteration.

"Massive" is the word, as it hogs a massive amount of pedalboard real estate. Much has to do with the reorganization of the controls and the combination of different circuits in this pedal I suppose.

[demo] Stone Deaf FX PDF-1 Parametric Distortion Filter (by Joris & Jesse)

Here's a demo of the Stone Deaf FX PDF-1 Parametric Distortion Filter recorded for Effects Database by Joris and Jesse of the Belgian band These Mountains Are Ghosts.

Who?

  • Joris Everaerts (guitar)
  • Jesse Sampermans (camera, video editing,....)

Gear used:

  • Hagstrom Deuce F
  • Ampeg V4 (late 70s)
  • Framus CS212 (Celestion V30 speakers)
  • Heil PR 30 mic

Positive:

  • Tonal options are very broad
  • Frequencies can be boosted, but also cut
  • Cool looks
  • Sturdy construction, to get vintage Maestro filter sounds with a modern and reliable build quality

Negative:

  • Can be noisy when used together with other pedals
  • No gain control
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